Advisory Opinion 1992-158

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Authors
South Carolina State Ethics Commission
Issue Date
1992-04-22
Type
Text
Item Language
Keywords
South Carolina State Ethics Commission , Advisory opinions--South Carolina , College teachers--South Carolina , Textbooks--Authorship , Computer programmers--South Carolina , Supplementary employment--South Carolina
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Alternative Title
Abstract
(A) Employees would be prohibited from accepting additional compensation for (1) speaking at college functions, (2) performing musical recitals, (3) speaking at college sponsored conferences, or (4) conducting college-sponsored camps, conferences, or seminars which are conducted in "an official capacity". The Commission does not believe that employees are prohibited from accepting compensation for conducting musical recitals, speaking at conferences, or sponsoring, camps, conferences, or seminars during a period when such employees are not under contract. As to the compensation for teaching a course above and beyond the normal load, the Commission offers no advice as that is a personnel question. (B) Complimentary textbooks should be maintained for use by the college and not maintained for the personal use of the faculty member. (C) A faculty member would not be precluded from accepting royalties for writing and/or publishing a textbook provided the adoption is handled in accordance with Section 8-13-700(B). (D) The Commission does not believe that the mere processing of a purchase requisition entails sufficient input to prohibit post-employment with the vendor who obtained such a purchase order or if from a vendor whose products are on State contract when the employee had no input into the development or administration of such contract. (E) The Commission knows of no reason why a public employee/programmer could not engage in devolving a computer program for another public entity consistent with the off-duty employment guidelines.
Description
Citation
Publisher
Rights
Copyright status determined to be in the public domain on April 27, 2020 by United States Supreme Court ruling (Georgia et al., Petitioners v. Public.Resource.Org, Inc. : 590 U.S.__(2020))
Journal
Volume
Issue
PubMed ID
DOI
ISSN
EISSN