Rice and the making of South Carolina : an introductory essay

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Authors
Littlefield, Daniel C.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History
Issue Date
1995
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Slavery--South Carolina--History , Rice trade--South Carolina--History , Slave trade--South Carolina , South Carolina--Rural conditions , South Carolina--History--Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775
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Abstract
Originally, Carolinians grew rice on dry land, but early in the eighteenth century, cultivation spread to swampy fresh water areas. Until the 1850s, rice reigned supreme. But large-scale rice production was limited to the tidal marshes and inland swamp, while cotton became profitable statewide after the invention of the cotton gin. In its heyday, however, rice made a few hundred planters extremely wealthy. It also contributed to cross culturation and the making of Carolina as a rich cultural hybrid. In this essay, it is this aspect of rice cultivation that Professor Littlefield describes.
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South Carolina State Library
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Copyright status undetermined. For more information contact, South Carolina State Library, 1500 Senate Street, Columbia, South Carolina 29201.
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