Heritage at Risk : South Carolina Archaeology Month, October 2019 : Fort Frederick

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Authors
Herron, Tammy
Gaillard, Meg
Smith, Karen
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources
University of South Carolina. Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology
South Carolina Department of Archives and History
Issue Date
2019-08-13
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South Carolina Archaeology Month--Posters , Fort Frederick (Port Royal, S.C.) , Historic preservation--South Carolina--Port Royal--Posters , Flood damage prevention--South Carolina--Port Royal--Posters , Archaeology--South Carolina--Port Royal--Posters
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Heritage at Risk : Fort Frederick
Abstract
While Heritage at Risk is a term most associated with cultural resources destroyed within short periods of time, Fort Frederick serves as an example of slow deterioration over centuries. Fort Frederick was constructed of tabby by the British Colonial Government between 1730 and 1734 along the Beaufort River in Port Royal, South Carolina. Within six years, Fort Frederick was considered unfit for service and abandoned. It later became part of a plantation, was occupied by Union forces during the Civil War, and served as the dock platform over which people walked to hear the first reading of the Emancipation Proclamation in the southern states. In 1999, the fort and 3-acres of surrounding land were acquired by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) Heritage Trust Program and dedicated as Fort Frederick Heritage Preserve (FFHP). In 2017, FFHP and other Beaufort County properties became part of the Reconstruction Era National Monument. More information about this and other SCDNR Heritage Trust properties can be found at http://heritagetrust.dnr.sc.gov.
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South Carolina State Library
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Records, documents, and information made available by the agencies of the South Carolina state government or its subdivisions are the property of the people of the state of South Carolina. Therefore, according to U.S. copyright law, the South Carolina State Library considers these items to be in the public domain (see Title 17, U.S.C.).
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